Category Archives: Youthful Movement

Fix Your Upper Cross Syndrome To Support an Ageless Body

Last week I shared with you stretches to relieve a slouchy posture. I briefly spoke about the two types of upper-body posture problems — excessive forward head lean and rounded shoulders. This week I want to go in greater detail about this dilemma called Upper Cross Syndrome (UCS) because it’s damaging your health.

What is Upper Cross Syndrome (UCS)

Upper Cross SyndromeAlso called Upper Crossed Syndrome, UCS is a condition where there is a muscle imbalance pattern in the head and shoulder regions. This condition is seen most often in those who work at a desk or who spend most of their day continuously in a position of poor posture.

With Upper Cross Syndrome, you can feel tightness in the levator scapula and upper trapezius (muscles you use to shrug). You will experience weakness in the scalines (muscles that helps you bend your head side to side) and sternocleidomastoid muscle (muscles that help you turn your head and extend your neck.) You will also suffer weakness in your rhomboids, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior (muscles that move and stabilize your shoulder blades).

All these imbalances lead to joint dysfunction especially in the upper neck, upper spine, and shoulder joints.

What does this mean?

It means that when a group of 4 to 5 muscles becomes too tight it can cause a chain reaction that leads to instability and dysfunction of the shoulder, which eventually leads to pain and injury.

How to Identify Upper Cross Syndrome

If you have the following symptoms you may have UCS:

  • Elevated & protracted shoulders (rounded shoulders) – This is when your chest muscles are so tight and the muscles between and below your shoulder blades are not strong enough to hold your shoulders back so instead they round forward.
  • Excessive forward head lean – Your head juts forward of your shoulders so it seems you are always looking down and not forward. Looking forward may also be difficult and painful.
  • kyphosis-lordosis-adamIncreased thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis – This is when you’re upper-back is hunchbacked or looks like you’re always in a slouching posture and when your lower back is curved more than normal. It may in fact be difficult to stand straight.
  • Rotation or abduction – The shoulder-blade (scapula bones) is moving away from the body so when you look at it from the side, you get the ‘wing effect’ , also known as winged-scapula.

If you have one or more of the symptoms, it can indicate your shoulder(s) are unstable and that means that you are at risk for  injury. Overcompensation —  when certain areas are working harder or not working at all because of dysfunction — can cause permanent damage.

Besides looking unpleasant when you walk around, when you have UCS it can affect your health both in the short-term and long-term.

Short-term, poor upper-body posture promotes improper breathing making your lungs and heart work harder. This can lead to shallow breathing, dizziness, and anxiety like symptoms. Bad posture hinders proper digestion making you susceptible to digestive problems such as heartburn, bloating, and slow bowel movement. As your organs work harder — to help you breathe, distribute blood, and digest food — they age faster.

You can also end up with some types of nerve pain in your neck that radiates into your arm(s). You can suffer headaches and rotator cuff problems. In the long-term, a person with UCS may face joint deterioration.

The good news is that you can prevent, make better, and even reverse the effects of years of ‘bad posture’ by paying attention to your body positioning now.

It’s not too late to stand taller, have less tension in your neck and chest area, and to stop the onset of chronic pain. Choose to support your ageless body — a body free of pain and disease — by improving your posture.

What You Can Do About Upper Cross Syndrome

If you have UCS, the shortened muscles will need to be restored before embarking on training the weakened muscles. You will need to learn the proper placement of your shoulders so you don’t continue to cause the same problem. You will need to pay attention to what your upper-back, shoulders, and neck muscles are doing on a daily basis.

Be aware of  your movements and make sure you are not repeating the position that is causing the problem in the first place. You may need rehabilitation depending on how far your injury has progressed.

Corrective Exercise Specialists, physical therapists, and chiropractors are the best therapists to help fix this problem. Your therapist will work with you to correct the problem by creating a corrective exercise program that will release the tension in the tight muscles, engage the inactive muscles, and strengthen the weak muscles.

As a corrective exercise specialist, I have designed a posture program that will help improve poor posture such as UCS.  I recommend trying my Better Posture in 30 Days program.

It’s a simple, effective, step-by step system of exercises geared to improve overall posture. If you’ve tried other systems or watched all the YouTube videos and still have not seen the results you want, perhaps it’s time to use a custom program.

Watch this video for stretches to improve some UCS issues.

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Standing & sitting straight is one way I support my good health and well-being. Click To Tweet

If you need help in personalizing a health, fitness, and beauty program for you, then check out my life-coaching services.

Your coach,

Jeanne

Resources:

‘What is Upper Cross Syndrome’ originally published in InspireHappy.com

Simple Stretches to Fix a Slouchy Posture to Look Confident

Your posture is a great way to show how good you feel, how confident your are, and definitely a way to exude a more ageless appearance.

Let’s agree that a slouchy posture makes a person look tired, sometimes even sad, and when a person’s posture is constantly bent over — they look older. In comparison a person with good posture appears happier, more confident, and vibrant.

As we get older we also lose bone density, muscle strength, and a general weakening of our posture. So it’s to our benefit to maintain our good posture today so we can stay strong and stand tall in our later years.

Here are some simple stretches to combat 2 types of upper-body postural problems — the excessive forward head lean and rounded shoulders.

Excessive forward head leanThe excessive forward head lean happens because the front neck muscles become tight and shortened while the upper-back and neck  muscles become weaker.  This happens mainly from working a desk job with poor desk area ergonomics and texting with bad posture.

Try these stretches to relieve the tightness in your neck area.

Neck stretchesa) Place one arm behind your back to keep the shoulder down

b) Using the other hand, gently pull at the side of the head for 30 seconds

It takes at least 30 seconds for your Golgi tendon – a sensory receptor organ in the muscle fibers — to relax.

c) Then gently pull the head forward, and then back — holding for 30 seconds

d) Repeat on the other side

Texting postureAnother way to stop a slouchy posture is to not slouch while texting. Look straight ahead when you text — not down and hunched over.

Round shoulders may happen due to bad habit, carrying a heavy backpack,  poor sitting/work station posture, and bad posture in when using your cellphone.

Rounded shoulders posturePart of the reason for rounded shoulders is because the chest muscles are very tight. Other reasons are because the back muscles — rhomboid, serratus anterior, lats — to name a few are weak.

Try these stretches to relieve some of the tightness you’re experiencing in your chest and neck area.

Chest stretchesa) Clasp your hands behind you stretching your chest area

b) Pull in your chin and ‘close your ribs’ by drawing in your stomach

c) Hold this stretch for 30 seconds

d) Add neck stretches to also relieve neck tightness which usually accompanies rounded shoulders

Bad posture in stretchingDO NOT stick out your chest or rib cage during stretch

I hope you find these stretches useful, relieving, and help you project more confidence. Here is a video showing them again and me promoting my Better Posture in 30 Days program.

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I'm bringing good posture back! (It's the new sexy!) Click To Tweet

If you need help in personalizing a health, fitness, and beauty program for you, then check out my life-coaching services.

Your coach,

Jeanne

What is an Ageless Lifestyle Exercise Program? How Do You Begin?

An ageless lifestyle exercise program has a specific goal — to achieve an ageless body so a person can live a youthful lifestyle.

An ageless body is one that is energetic, strong, agile, flexible, balanced, and pain-free. A youthful lifestyle is an existence filled with hope, play, and purpose.

Specifically, an ageless body has youthful energy — a vibrant feeling that makes you want to play and explore. This type of body has “functional” strength which means it’s strong enough to do everyday tasks without too much effort.

An ageless physique is agile and flexible, bending with ease and moving with grace. This body is balanced — the mind, body, and spirit moving, flowing, and interacting in harmony.

Lastly anageless body is pain-free. There is minimal muscle and joint pain in an ageless person. There are no signs of excessive stress, fatigue, or disease.

The ageless body is ripe and eager to experience what life has to offer. It looks forward to participating and engaging in the game of life feeling untethered by time.

What it is NOT

An ageless lifestyle exercise program is not about looks, how much the body weighs, or its fat ratio. At Inspire Youthful, we believe if you focus on being energetic, strong, agile, flexible, balanced, and pain-free — all that other stuff works itself out.

When following an ageless lifestyle exercise program you will invariably settle into your ideal weight, posses the right amount of fat for your body type, and look the way you should — healthy.

Exercise is just one part of an ageless lifestyle exercise program. Intuitive eating, mindful wellness, and spirit connection rounds out the holistic system which produces the ageless lifestyle we desire.

How to Begin

Here is a step-by-step plan good for a beginner to moderate exerciser:

1. Check in with your doctor for an “all-clear” to move and get your groove on.

2. Begin a walking program of leisurely walking 3-5x a week starting for 30 minutes then working your way up to 60 minutes.

3. Start an exercise regimen that addresses joint stability and increases core strength.

4. Incorporate gentle and flowing physical activity which can be a beginner yoga, Pilates, or tai chi class.

5. Start meditating, journaling, and / or reading self-awareness encouraging books to increase mindful wellness.

6. Incorporate either the Metabolic Typing Diet, Paleo Diet, or our combined and spiritually infused approach of Intuitive Eating.

7. Create and nurture a spiritual path that supports your healthy and happy lifestyle.

8. Add some type of healthy and playful activity to your lifestyle like team sports, gaming, or dancing to name a few.

9. Progressively add functional strength exercises and intermittent sprinting to your workout routine.

10. Proactively participate in life adventures and have more fun!

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I do the best I can for my body. Click To Tweet

If you need help implementing your ageless lifestyle exercise program check out my life-coaching service.

Now go live your best life sister! ROAR!

Your coach,

Jeanne

Lots of Running is Bad for People Who Want to Age Well

To age well means to have a body that is healthy, vibrant, agile, flexible, balanced, and chronic-pain free.

Frequent, excessive, and long distance running does not promote an ageless lifestyle and here are 6 reasons why.

1. Too much running will overwork the body putting you in a position to suffer injury and chronic-pain.

Over-training and laborious running is bad for your muscles and joints.

The repetitive movements of running  and constant impact to the body from the foot  pounding increase the wear and tear of the joints.

Imagine the health of a car that is driven 10,000 miles a year compared to the health of a vehicle that is driven 50,000 miles a year. The latter will need more tune-ups and replacement parts sooner.

Running related injuries are: knee pain, foot and ankle strains, stress fractures, and back pain. 40% of running injuries are knee pain injuries.

If you are overweight or have poor body mechanics, these injuries may happen sooner as the extra load and impact will wear on the body.

2. Running can create and exacerbate muscle imbalances.

Most runners develop tightness and tension in the quads, hamstrings, butt, and calf areas of the body. Tight and over-worked muscles can lead to pain and injury.

For example, tight leg muscles can contribute to knee and back pain.

Specifically, a tight Iliotibial band (fibers that run on the side of the leg) can adversely affect the knee, causing anything from a mild irritation (whiny knee), to chronic pain and swelling (runners knee). A tight piraformis (deep butt muscle) can lead to back pain and even a sciatic nerve flare (sciatica).

3. Running decreases flexibility.

Life long runners are generally not flexible. Many suffer from tight hamstrings preventing them from touching their toes with straight legs.

They can also have tight foot and calf muscles predisposing them to foot pain and injury.

When you are injured other parts of your wellness lifestyle may suffer. While injured you may have limited mobility, putting a stop to all other exercises you may do. Your calorie expenditure will change and if your eating habits don’t follow suit, you may gain weight.

Many people who get injured typically experience mood swings and decreased energy.

4. Running can contribute to poor posture.

Lots of running overwork the leg and butt muscles causing them to become tight which can affect posture.

Tight butt and legs can alter the position of the hips causing tightness in the front of the hips which can pull-down on the abs and torso rounding the spine giving way to a slouchy  posture. As the abs are pulled down, so are the chest muscles, which then rounds the shoulders and creates a forward-leaning head.

Unchecked, these muscle imbalances will contribute to a poor standing posture and chronic pain.

Bad posture can lead to neck and back pain, and may trigger migraine headaches. A hunched-over posture can also affect breathing, digestion, and mental well-being.

5. Long distance running fatigues and ages the body.

When your body is extremely tired and rundown it has to work harder to bring itself back to homeostasis.  Organs and cells that work harder age faster. The body will also need extra nutrients to repair tissue and if it is not provided, the body will cannibalize itself.

Although any physical demand on the body creates free radicals which can damage cells and age the body, excessive physical fitness creates even more free radicals aging the body that much faster.

6. Runners may suffer other signs of aging caused by running outside such as:

  • Fine lines and wrinkles caused by wind and harsh elements
  • Sun damage
  • Dry skin from weather and pollutants
  • Acne from sweating and pollutants
  • Women may develop ‘runner boobs’

If running is your thing, but you also want to age well, then this is my running recommendation…

In my 12+ years experience as a persona trainer, I have found there is a sweet-spot for people to enjoy running — where they can have the benefits without injuring or aging the body too much.

Each person is different. With my clients, I have found that if they run 2x a week, running no more than 3 miles (<5k) each time, they don’t suffer the common runner injuries and they don’t have too many aches and pain.  There are some who can run a little longer, and others who need to run less.

If you have chronic pain from running, then you are running too much. Scale back until you find that sweet-spot where you can run and be pain-free.

I Recommend Cross-Training with Your Short Running Program

  • Add body weight strength training. Focus on increasing butt strength, moving laterally, and single-leg balance exercises to help prevent knee and ankle injury.
  • Do myofascia release work using a foam roller or lacrosse ball. Relieve any tension in the legs, butt, and upper body to combat poor posture.
  • Improve core strength to prevent injury and improve posture.
  • Do Pilates, Yoga, or any deep stretching to relax tight muscles, increase flexibility, balance, and core strength.
  • Add sprints to increase cardiovascular endurance and variety.

 Anti-aging Techniques for Runners

  • Wear sunglasses to prevent squinting, wind burns, and pollutants that may cause wrinkles and fine lines around the eyes.
  • Wear sunscreen to prevent sun damage. Put extra sunscreen on sensitive and exposed areas such as the face, decolletage, back of the neck, and top of the shoulders.
  • Shower immediately and exfoliate often to remove dead skins cells and prevent break outs.
  • Moisturize the face and body with olive oil or coconut oil to hydrate parched skin.
  • Eat foods high in antioxidants to combat the free radicals created by exercise.
  • Well endowed women should double-up on the sport bras to minimize breast bounce  and prevent over-stretching of the skin.

Tweet it like you mean it!

I run just enough to feel good and stay healthy. Click To Tweet

If you need help creating a health, fitness, and mindful wellness program, then check out my life-coaching services.

Your coach,

Jeanne

Sources:

Featured Image by Mike Baird

http://www.runnersworld.com/health/big-7-body-breakdowns?page=single

Featured Video Play Icon

Youthful Movement Series: Core, Legs, Chest with Handstand Practice Part 4

My Youthful Movement Series is about moving with grace, bending with ease, and creating vibrant energy.

A youthful movement practice strives to make a strong, agile, flexible, balanced, and energetic body to support an ageless lifestyle.

The exercises used are meant to carry over into real life; helping one to be more healthy, efficient, and less stressed.

This particular series focuses on legs, core, chest, and handstands!

Click here if you missed part 1 and to learn why inversions are good for you!

Click here for part 2!

Click here for part 3!

Remember, if you are feeling bad, don’t do the exercises.

If these style of movements are new to you, take it easy, listen to your body, and practice caution.

Ask your doctor if these types of exercises are good for you.

All the exercises can be done for time or reps. Choose the method that’s best for you.

I advice to do the routine 1x a day or at the least 3x a week.

Make sure to check out the whole series because each exercise builds on the moves learned in the previous video!

  1. Warm up 10 each – wrists, shake, shoulders, neck/head, reach, side bends, knee ups, cross toe touch
  2. Squat pose – 1 minute
  3. Panther into single leg balance – 1 minute
  4. Spider cross-crawl push-up – 1 minute
  5. Kneeling lunge with double arm back bend  – 30 secs
  6.  Elephant arabesque & plank – 1 minute
  7.  Plank – 30 secs
  8. Plank to wild thing – 1 minute
  9.  Capoiera lunges with alternating crouching lunges – 1 minute
  10.  Crouch and single leg arabesque – 30 secs each side
  11. Lunge into single leg knee strike – 30 secs each side
  12. Floor hollow body – 30 seconds
  13.  Wrist work – 30 seconds
  14.  L shape – 30
  15.  Flush wall handstand – 30
  16.  Kick ups into handstand hold – 4-5x
Featured Video Play Icon

Youthful Movement Series: Core, Legs, Chest with Handstand Practice Part 3

My Youthful Movement Series is about moving with grace, bending with ease, and creating vibrant energy.

A youthful movement practice strives to make a strong, agile, flexible, balanced, and energetic body to support an ageless lifestyle.

The exercises used are meant to carry over into real life; helping one to be more healthy, efficient, and less stressed.

Click here if you missed part 1 and to learn why inversions are good for you!

Click here for part 2!

Remember, if you are feeling bad, don’t do the exercises.

If these style of movements are new to you, take it easy, listen to your body, and practice caution.

Ask your doctor if these types of exercises are good for you.

All the exercises can be done for time or reps. Choose the method that’s best for you.

I advice to do the routine 1x a day or at the least 3x a week.

The next video in the series will build on the moves learned each week. Each video will be posted on Sat for the month of February.

  1. Warm up 10 each – wrists, shake, shoulders, side bends, cross toe touch, knee ups, hip circles
  2. Squat pose – 1 minute
  3. Panther pose right and left hands up – 1 minute
  4. Spider crawl push-up – 1 minute
  5. Single leg kneeling with single arm camel back bend – 1 minute
  6. Elephant & plank – 1 minute
  7. Plank – 30 secs
  8. Side plank to side plank – 1 minute
  9. Alternating back lunges – 1 minute
  10. Single leg mini-squat and stork balance pose – 30 secs each side (1 minute)
  11. Hamstring stretch – 30 secs
  12. Floor hollow body – 30 seconds
  13. Wrist stretches
  14. L shape – 30secs
  15. 135 shape – 30sec
  16.  Alternating kick ups 3 each leg
  17. Wall hand stand with bent knees hold for time
Featured Video Play Icon

Youthful Movement Series: Core, legs, and Back with Handstand Practice Part 2

My Youthful Movement Series is about moving with grace, bending with ease, and creating vibrant energy.

A youthful movement practice strives to make a strong, agile, flexible, balanced, and energetic body to support an ageless lifestyle.

The exercises used are meant to carry over into real life; helping one to be more healthy, efficient, and less stressed.

Click here if you missed part 1 and to learn why inversions are good for you!

Remember, if you are feeling bad, don’t do the exercises.

If these style of movements are new to you, take it easy, listen to your body, and practice caution.

Ask your doctor if these types of exercises are good for you.

All the exercises can be done for time or reps. Choose the method that’s best for you.

I advice to do the routine 1x a day or at the least 3x a week.

The next video in the series will build on the moves learned each week. Each video will be posted on Sat for the month of February.

  1. Warm up: wrists circles, shake body, shoulder circles, neck bends, side bends, cross toe touch, knee-ups, and hip circles
  2. Deep resting squat pose – 1 minute
  3. Panther pose right and left with side kick – 1 minute
  4. Quadruped mini-pushup and back kick – 30 secs each side
  5. Kneeling squat single arm camel back bends – 30 secs
  6. Downward dog & upward dog – 1 minute
  7. Plank – 30 secs
  8. Kneeling run and prayer twist – 1 min
  9. Alternating kneeling half star pose – 30 secs
  10. Runner stance back kick and stand – 30 secs each side
  11. Cow & camel stretches – 30 secs
  12. Hollow-boy hold – 30 secs
  13. Wrist stretches – 30 secs
  14. L shape on wall with single leg raise – 15 secs each side
  15. 135 shape on wall – 30 secs
  16. Kick ups with L shape to the wall 3x each leg
  17. Wall handstand in tabletop position hold for time 2-3x

Youthful Movement: Inspiring an Ageless Body with Exercise and Inversions

When I started this blog a few months ago I always had the intention of adding fitness videos as one of its components. Because of injuries and other delays, it has taken me some time to put the special fitness program that I feel helps one to achieve an ageless body together.

As it happens, my injuries were a God  send because they gave me time to reflect on my personal fitness goals which in turn became the basis to the fitness program I designed for Inspire Youthful.

As an elite personal trainer, Corrective Exercise Specialist, Pilates professional, and dancer I have had the privilege to learn many methods of exercise. To boot, I have dabbled in  martial arts (kempo, tai chi, muay thai) with the fluid and power moves coming natural to me.

With my movement experience I wanted to create a system of exercise that promoted my ageless lifestyle. I knew this fitness program needed to keep me strong, agile, flexible, balanced, energetic, and it had to be fun.

I also knew that I didn’t want to get injured, feel too sore to move, or suffer any aches and pains from doing it.

At 40 years old, my fitness goal is to have an ageless body. 

I define an ageless body as a one with functional strength, agility, flexibility, balance, and vibrancy.

Furthermore, an ageless body is free of disease and chronic-pain.

Therefore, along with youthful movement, to have a truly ageless body, one needs to also have a health-healing personality, practice intuitive-eating, and do ageless beauty maintenance. I call these the four pillars of youthfulness.

For the month of February I invite you to join me in a fitness challenge to promote an ageless body.

I’ve designed 4 workout videos consisting of 10 mins of body weight exercises and 5 minutes of handstand practice to promote youthful movement.

I have a feeling your eyes popped open with the words “handstand practice?!” But hear me out.

I believe one must do inversions — where the head is below the heart — daily to have an ageless body.

Here are the 3 reasons why:

1. Inversions improve blood flow throughout the body.

Increasing blood flow will bring healing nutrients, oxygen, and encourage the removal of waste and toxins in the body.

2. Inversions are a de-stressor.

In order to have an ageless body one must handle stress well.

Stress ages the body like no other. It makes the body systems work harder, causing disharmony within the body and unnecessarily aging the organs, tissues, and cells faster.

Next time you feel under pressure or stress, get into childs pose, downward-dog, standing toe-touch,  and / or head-stand and feel how your body is put at ease almost immediately.

3. Inversions keep a person playful.

Maintaining a sense of playfulness in one’s life promotes an ageless lifestyle. Never lose your ability to play and be silly because those young at heart, almost always look young in person!

So get upside-down daily and see the world in a different perspective!

Here is the first video of  the series:

If you are feeling bad, don’t do the exercises. If these style of movements are new to you, take it easy, listen to your body, and practice caution. Ask your doctor if these types of exercises are good for you.

The exercises can be done for time or reps. Choose the method that’s best for you.

I advice to do the routine 1x a day or at the least 3x a week.

The next video in the series will build on the moves learned each week. Each video will be posted on Sat for the month of February.

  1. Warm up: wrists circles, shake body, shoulder circles, neck bends, arm swings, side bends, cross toe touch, and knee-ups.
  2. Deep resting squat pose – 1 minute
  3. Panther pose right and left – 1 minute
  4. Quadruped contra-lateral reach and touch – 30 secs each side
  5. Single arm reach with supported camel back bends – 30 secs
  6. Cat and cow – 30 secs
  7. Plank – 30 secs
  8. Torso twist  – 30 secs
  9. Kneeling run – 1 min
  10. Runner stance back kick  – 30 secs each side
  11. Standing toe touch stretch – 30 secs
  12. Wrist stretches – 30 secs
  13. L shape on wall – 30 secs
  14. 135 shape on wall – 30 secs
  15. Kick ups to the wall 3x each leg
  16. Wall hand stand hold for time 2-3x

8 Benefits of Good Posture

Posture – we hear a lot about it but what exactly is it?

Posture is simply the position that you keep while you are sitting, standing or lying.

When you have good posture you will put the least amount of strain on your supporting muscles and ligaments when you are active and your body is moving.

Here are 8 Benefits of Good Posture:

1. Good Digestion

Good digestion is directly linked to your overall good health. When you can keep your rib cage in proper position, your digestion system is free and open and can work easier.

2. Stops the Development of a Bad Back

Back problems are a common problem that far too many people suffer from. Back pain can be extremely painful and it can even be debilitating. Good posture can make a huge difference and relieve pain.

3. Breathe Easier

Shallow breathing is common with those who suffer from other health issues. When your posture improves, your muscles will relax and that can improve your respiration.

4. Reduce Tension

Most of us deal with tension at one time or another. It can make your shoulders and upper back have tightness and pain. Proper posture can help to reduce tension.

5. Improved Concentration

Research has shown that good posture actually improves your concentration and your mental performance. One study showed that when we are more relaxed and tension free, we breathe better and thus perform better.

Your brain needs 20 percent oxygen to work properly. When you breathe properly, you think clearer and have better concentration.

6. Muscle Tone

As we age, we lose muscle tone. It’s often referred to as the “middle-age spread” because we tend to see it some time after 35 years of age.

The stomach is often the area most hit.  From an inactive lifestyle to constantly sitting behind a desk or car, the muscles in your abdomen and core become weaker as you age.

Working on your posture can help to strengthen the stomach, back, and pelvic muscles which comprise your core.

7. Improve Your Image

 When you have good posture you feel more attractive and look more confident. With good posture, you will come across as assertive and self-assured. You will feel better about yourself because you are self-confident.

Try this experiment. Sit slumped over for 30 seconds – how do you feel? Now sit up straight for 30 seconds – do you notice the difference?

8. Avoid Some Health Issues

Backache, chest pressure, slipped disc, poor circulation of blood, etc. that’s just a few of the health concerns that better posture can help with.

Good posture leaves you looking better and feeling better. That self-confidence that you portray in your stance – suddenly that is just how you feel, and as you begin to enjoy the health benefits of better posture, your physical body will also feel better!

Far too many of us grew up with bad posture and never once thought about it. As I firmly believe it’s never too late to improve the quality of our lives, now is as good a time as any to work on improving your posture and begin enjoying the long-term benefits.

Tweet it like you mean it!

From preventing back pain to boosting confidence, good posture is essential to my well-being. Click To Tweet

If you need help improving your posture, check out my Better Posture in 30 Days challenge!

Your coach,

Jeanne

Better Posture in 30 Days ProgramDays ProgramspireYouthful

Sources:

Featured image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net